Monthly Archives: October 2012

The Cultural Work of Pop-Fiction

The four volume Twilight Saga by Stephanie Miller Today, young people love serial fiction about vampires and the dystopian future.  In the 19th century, young Americans consumed dime novels about the frontiers of that day: the American West; “exotic” locales … Continue reading

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Many Hands, Many Voices: Writing, Editing, and Publishing Indian Captivity Narratives Part II

by Zabelle Stodola, University of Arkansas at Little Rock In part one, I discussed several letters having to do with the writing of Josephine Huggins’ captivity narrative, and I also considered the fact that the holograph manuscript is missing. In this … Continue reading

Posted in history of printing, Josephine Huggins, Zabelle Stodola | 1 Comment

In Which Real Indians Are Captive to Dime Hero Wanna-bes

Oecetiduta commented on my post, Yellow-back Gold: “Too bad the stories of  ‘Indians’ being held captive are not shared, too.” That is precisely why historians of the western Indian wars need to pay attention to the pop-culture of the 19th century. … Continue reading

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Innocence and Evil

This engraving, titled “The Minnesota Massacre,” faces the title page for Josephine Huggins’s story in Beadle’s Boys’ Book of Romance and Adventure No. 10. Dime publishers had extensive collections of stock artwork they recycled in multiple titles. While the expressions … Continue reading

Posted in Dime Books, Edward Sylvester Ellis, Josephine Huggins | 1 Comment

Meet “Mrs. Huggins, the Minnesota Captive”

Cover (facsimile) of Beadle and Adams Boys Books of Romance and Adventure, No. 10 containing “The Minnesota Captive,” 1864, as reproduced in the Garland Library of Narratives of North American Indian Captivities, vol. 86, 1978. ***** “When the reader takes … Continue reading

Posted in Dime Books, Edward Sylvester Ellis, Josephine Huggins | 1 Comment

Many Hands, Many Voices: Writing, Editing, and Publishing Indian Captivity Narratives

by Zabelle Stodola, University of Arkansas at Little Rock “Captivity narratives are tricky texts” says my friend and colleague Christopher Castiglia who teaches at Penn State University and who published the book Bound and Determined: Captivity, Culture-Crossing, and White Womanhood … Continue reading

Posted in Captivity, Josephine Huggins, Zabelle Stodola | 2 Comments

Yellow-back Gold

Malaeska: The Indian Wife of the White Hunter by Mrs. Ann E. Stephens, June 1860. Edward S. Ellis’s first dime novel, Seth Jones: Captives of the Frontier, 1860, is said to have been one of Abraham Lincoln’s favorite stories. Myrtle: The … Continue reading

Posted in A Thrilling Narrative, Dime Books, Edward Sylvester Ellis, history of printing | 2 Comments